Maori Haka

A haka is a traditional dance form of the Maori of New Zealand. It is a posture dance with shouted accompaniment, performed by a group.

Haka are performed for various reasons: for amusement, as a hearty welcome to distinguished guests, or to acknowledge great achievements or occasions. War haka, which had their own term, ‘peruperu’, were originally performed by warriors before a battle, proclaiming their strength and prowess in order to intimidate the opposition. Today, haka constitute an integral part of formal or official welcome ceremonies for distinguished visitors or foreign dignitaries, serving to impart a sense of the importance of the occasion.

The Haka – War Dance Rugby
httpv://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cle20lQg0Qs
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Definition of the Haka
httpv://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1jRQ1Yw7E1I

There is an aura about it and you cant really put your finger on it not even as players.
When I do it I feel the presence of past and present All Blacks that are with me…its spiritual.
It gives me such an adrenal rush that I’d run in through a brick wall.
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I know where it comes from. I know what it means. And I think it’s the perfect way for us to put down the challenge. There’s the jersey and there’s the Haka – here performed by the invincibles of 1924 not quite with the intensity of today. As images of rugby began to reach a wider audience the Haka became a popular and fascinating part of the all black ritual. And then came Wayne Buck Shelford! Shelformed transformed the all black Haka into the powerful war dance of today.
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It was decided that if we are gonna do the Haka we are gonna do it properly and by doing it correctly people started enjoying it. And so as you know you didn’t have to have practice it but if we did practice it was only get the people into stance, the right stance and you know use their hands correctly – little things like that because we are gonna do it, we were gonna do it we’d do it the same way and by going to Te Aute in 87, really showed the old blokes how Hakas were done.
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Shelford took the all blacks to Te Aute College where 400 students performed the Haka and reminded them of much older forces at work. Hakas are challenges and you are basically laying down the gauntlet to the opposite side you know lets have a …lets go to battle and the winner walks away. And in rugby its the winner walks away with the points and they take all the glory. Its just important that treated with respect by the people who do it. It is part of our culture and not everyone in the all blacks has been a Maori or of that descent but its part of your culture, part of your identity.
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The Haka is part and parcel of you really getting yourself right up there come kick off time and you know just before the kick off to be able to perform that Haka really gets your blood boiling and really is the icing on the cake in terms of you know going to war.
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Its having that feeling of putting on the jersey and pulling it over your head going out there doing the Haka u know u just feel so amped, pumped, and ready to go and you know its going to war virtually. What I do before Haka is just you know get into…into sync with the meaning you know and its need to be powerful and really fearsome. So you can’t really go out there and do it when you know you are in a happy mood. Or when you… just to show off you got action. That’s why beautiful…test match…you know… you gotta get out there and you’ve got give it a 100%.
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The Haka goes back to the Maoridom and the roots of our country and you know we feel a passion for the country not just the game when we perform the Haka. And I think the players take a lot of pride in the Haka.